Gardening is gangsta

I'm sure your first reaction to the title of this post is... what? But it's true. Young Jeffrey over at MOViN 92.5 FM told me so.

It's clear that now that the risk of snow has finally passed (it has passed, right? I mean, this is SEATTLE!) and we occasionally see some blue in the sky, we are all starting to feel that itch to plant something outdoors. But as it's still pretty cold, at least at night, it might be better to plant some nice indoor plants that can enjoy the occasional bursts of light from a windowsill. So that's exactly what I did.

When the spring-ish urge first hit me, I was bound and determined to get to a local nursery to see what amazing local plants I could find for some mason jars. I was very inspired by all these images on Pinterest of tulips grown in glass, so I was especially hoping for bulbs. I left work early (but later than I needed to) and spent forty minutes in traffic just to arrive at the nursery as they were closing.

At this point, a normal person would have just gone home and come back the next day, but I'm sure we've established that I am not a normal person. I spent forty minutes in traffic to get some bulbs and I was going to get some bulbs. A quick yelp search of nearby nurseries that were open showed only one - Home Depot. So to the Home Depot I went for bulbs.

I was now two cities away (which in the Seattle metro is like two neighborhoods in other major cities) at a Home Depot that was different from the Home Depot down the street from my apartment in the worst way - they did not have a well-organized garden section. Here is the short list of problems I encountered:

  • The majority of the bulbs were not actually in the garden section - only the bulk 40-bulb packs were.
  • All but TWO of their house plants were bright light plants. Because, you know, bright light is what Seattle is known for.
  • They didn't even have any tulip bulbs - only fully grown and flowering tulips. *sigh*

But it's fine, I'd already compromised this much already, so I explored the bulbs they did have and actually came away with some interesting possibilities. I also had some cuttings from my coworker Cristy's crab cactii, so I was all set to have a nice evening of planting things I had no experience growing before (and that I honestly had not really done any research on).

What I planted

Crab cactii

My extremely sweet coworker Cristy was telling me about her excessively healthy and beautiful crab cactii (also called a Christmas cactus, Easter cactus, Thanksgiving cactus, and I'm sure a few other holiday-based names). After I oohed and awwwed over her pictures all afternoon, she was kind enough to bring me four, count them FOUR, cuttings from her four different color cactii. So of course, I was like, these can totally grow in some hydroponic mason jars , right? Well, we'll see. But Cristy, they are amazing - thank you, thank you!

What I used

Steps

  1. Wash everything very thoroughly.
  2. Assemble the mason jar planters so that you have an empty net pot with a wick sticking out of each one.
  3. In each mason jar, place a plant cutting on the wick and surround it with enough glass pieces to stabilize it.
  4. Mix the nutrients together according to Hydropincs-Simplified Flora Mixng Chart for vegetative growth (3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro, and 1 part FloraBloom). I made a gallon for all of the plants, but used two cups in each of these mason jars.
  5. Place in a sunny window and watch flourish (hopefully).

Starting Stats

The colors below may be off but I think they are correct.

Blinky
Cutting Red crab cactus from Cristy
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17
Pinky
Cutting Pink crab cactus from Cristy
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17
Inky
Cutting Pinkish-white crab cactus from Cristy
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17
Clyde
Cutting White crab cactus from Cristy
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17

Crocosmias

These are some orange and yellow flowers that made me think of a warm, summer day in the best way. Hopefully they look as cheery as the package. Since I saw so many Pinterest pins of tulips in glass, I figured any bulb could grow like that if it wasn't too tall. Hopefully that ends up being at least partially true.

What I used

Steps

  1. Wash, wash, wash, wash.
  2. Fill each mason jar with 5(ish) ounces of glass.
  3. Place a bulb in the middle of each jar, putting some extra glass around it to keep it stable.
  4. Mix the nutrients together according to Hydropincs-Simplified Flora Mixng Chart for vegetative growth (3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro, and 1 part FloraBloom). I made a gallon for all of the plants, but filled each jar up to the bottom of the bulb.
  5. Place in a sunny window and watch it grow!

Starting Stats

Amy Adams
Bulb Crocosmia bulb from Home Depot
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17
Ron Howard
Bulb Crocosmia bulb from Home Depot
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17
Felicia Day
Bulb Crocosmia bulb from Home Depot
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17

Liatris

These are some purple fuzzy flowers that are weird and exotic looking and that was enough to convince me to try them out!

What I used

Steps

  1. Scrub-a-dub-dub.
  2. Fill each mason jar with 5(ish) ounces of glass.
  3. Place a bulb in the middle of each jar, putting some extra glass around it to keep it stable.
  4. Mix the nutrients together according to Hydropincs-Simplified Flora Mixng Chart for vegetative growth (3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro, and 1 part FloraBloom). I made a gallon for all of the plants, but filled each jar up to the bottom of the bulb.
  5. Place in a sunny window and hope it grows!

Starting Stats

Kelly Osborne
Bulb Liatris bulb from Home Depot
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17
Katy Perry
Bulb Liatris bulb from Home Depot
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17
Demi Lovato
Bulb Liatris bulb from Home Depot
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17

Dahlia

Okay I realize Dahlias are... much... taller than the other bulbs, but they're just so pretty, I couldn't resist. So I sacrificed a vase for this project.

What I used

Steps

  1. Tired of washing yet?
  2. Fill the vase about a third of the way with glass pieces.
  3. Place the bulb in the middle of the vase. The bulb is giant and sort of lumpy so center it as best as you can and secure it with more glass.
  4. Mix the nutrients together according to Hydropincs-Simplified Flora Mixng Chart for vegetative growth (3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro, and 1 part FloraBloom). I made a gallon for all of the plants, but filled the vase to the bottom of the bulb.
  5. Place in a sunny window and you're done!

Starting Stats

Dahlia Parton
Bulb Dahlia bulb from Home Depot
Nutrients 3 parts FloraGro, 2 parts FloraMicro Hardwater, and 1 part FloraBloom in tap water
Light source South-facing window
Date planted 3/23/17